scrapironflotilla:

A variety of First World War trench clubs. The top club sporting the words “Patent Applied For”, an example of soldierly humour.
Although the First World War is generally thought of as a technological war, primarily about artillery and machine guns there was a significant amount of hand to hand combat due to the need for infantry to capture and hold trench networks. Troops on both sides of the conflict devised a variety of brutal and effective weapons, most commonly spiked clubs. They were used to great effect during trench raids, when soldiers were less likely to fire weapons for fear of alerting nearby enemies.
scrapironflotilla:

A variety of First World War trench clubs. The top club sporting the words “Patent Applied For”, an example of soldierly humour.
Although the First World War is generally thought of as a technological war, primarily about artillery and machine guns there was a significant amount of hand to hand combat due to the need for infantry to capture and hold trench networks. Troops on both sides of the conflict devised a variety of brutal and effective weapons, most commonly spiked clubs. They were used to great effect during trench raids, when soldiers were less likely to fire weapons for fear of alerting nearby enemies.
scrapironflotilla:

A variety of First World War trench clubs. The top club sporting the words “Patent Applied For”, an example of soldierly humour.
Although the First World War is generally thought of as a technological war, primarily about artillery and machine guns there was a significant amount of hand to hand combat due to the need for infantry to capture and hold trench networks. Troops on both sides of the conflict devised a variety of brutal and effective weapons, most commonly spiked clubs. They were used to great effect during trench raids, when soldiers were less likely to fire weapons for fear of alerting nearby enemies.
scrapironflotilla:

A variety of First World War trench clubs. The top club sporting the words “Patent Applied For”, an example of soldierly humour.
Although the First World War is generally thought of as a technological war, primarily about artillery and machine guns there was a significant amount of hand to hand combat due to the need for infantry to capture and hold trench networks. Troops on both sides of the conflict devised a variety of brutal and effective weapons, most commonly spiked clubs. They were used to great effect during trench raids, when soldiers were less likely to fire weapons for fear of alerting nearby enemies.
scrapironflotilla:

A variety of First World War trench clubs. The top club sporting the words “Patent Applied For”, an example of soldierly humour.
Although the First World War is generally thought of as a technological war, primarily about artillery and machine guns there was a significant amount of hand to hand combat due to the need for infantry to capture and hold trench networks. Troops on both sides of the conflict devised a variety of brutal and effective weapons, most commonly spiked clubs. They were used to great effect during trench raids, when soldiers were less likely to fire weapons for fear of alerting nearby enemies.

scrapironflotilla:

A variety of First World War trench clubs. The top club sporting the words “Patent Applied For”, an example of soldierly humour.

Although the First World War is generally thought of as a technological war, primarily about artillery and machine guns there was a significant amount of hand to hand combat due to the need for infantry to capture and hold trench networks. Troops on both sides of the conflict devised a variety of brutal and effective weapons, most commonly spiked clubs. They were used to great effect during trench raids, when soldiers were less likely to fire weapons for fear of alerting nearby enemies.

wwiafrica:

On September 26th 1914, Duala, then the capital of German Kamerun, fell to allied forces. Seven weeks earlier, on Aug 8 1914, Rudolf Duala Manga Bell King of the Duala was hanged by the Germans for “High treason.” Rudolf Duala Manga bell lead a resistance to overthrow German colonial rule. Read more here

The top image shows what a standard trench system on the Western Front looked like when maintained and relatively untouched by artillery. The bottom image shows what a trench system looks like after a sustained bombardment before a battle.
A view of the Flers Battlefield, showing an old front line trench improved by the Australians during the winter of 1916-1917 on the Somme.
A view of Uhlan trench in the German system at Messines, showing the devastating effect of the Anzac artillery fire which preceded the battle of 7 June. The top image shows what a standard trench system on the Western Front looked like when maintained and relatively untouched by artillery. The bottom image shows what a trench system looks like after a sustained bombardment before a battle.
A view of the Flers Battlefield, showing an old front line trench improved by the Australians during the winter of 1916-1917 on the Somme.
A view of Uhlan trench in the German system at Messines, showing the devastating effect of the Anzac artillery fire which preceded the battle of 7 June.

The top image shows what a standard trench system on the Western Front looked like when maintained and relatively untouched by artillery. The bottom image shows what a trench system looks like after a sustained bombardment before a battle.

A view of the Flers Battlefield, showing an old front line trench improved by the Australians during the winter of 1916-1917 on the Somme.

A view of Uhlan trench in the German system at Messines, showing the devastating effect of the Anzac artillery fire which preceded the battle of 7 June.

Near Le Barque, France. Five unidentified Australian Pioneers making a duckboard bridge across the trenches of the ‘Maze’.

Near Le Barque, France. Five unidentified Australian Pioneers making a duckboard bridge across the trenches of the ‘Maze’.

Men of the 10th Battalion AIF enjoying a hot meal in the trenches, in the line at Eaucourt l’Abbaye, during the Somme advance. To carry the hot stew and tea, petrol tins and hot food containers were used. As the petrol tins were not cleaned out well before being used for food, soldiers dinners and water transported in them often tasted strongly of petrol.

Generals Walker of the 1st Australian Division and Monash of the 3rd were both well known for the care they took of their men. They both had field kitchens set up as close to the front line trenches as possible so that the troops could get hot meals whilst on active duty and nissen huts were often provided for shelter from the elements.

German prisoners captured in a raid at Stormy Trench, near Bazentin, lined up before a British Intelligence Officer for examination.

A sick parade at Eaucourt L’Abbaye, during the advance on the Somme in the winter of 1917. ‘Trench feet’ was the chief complaint. Note the soldier with his legs enclosed in sandbags as a temporary protection against mud and damp.

Looking back from Lone Pine to the jumping off trench from which the 1st Australian Infantry Brigade commenced its successful attack on Lone Pine on 6 August 1915. Several corpses are lying in the foreground amid debris and coils of barbed wire. Looking back from Lone Pine to the jumping off trench from which the 1st Australian Infantry Brigade commenced its successful attack on Lone Pine on 6 August 1915. Several corpses are lying in the foreground amid debris and coils of barbed wire.

Looking back from Lone Pine to the jumping off trench from which the 1st Australian Infantry Brigade commenced its successful attack on Lone Pine on 6 August 1915. Several corpses are lying in the foreground amid debris and coils of barbed wire.

Thesis reading over the last few weeks. I didn’t realise the volume of reading until it’s all together. Thesis reading over the last few weeks. I didn’t realise the volume of reading until it’s all together.

Thesis reading over the last few weeks. I didn’t realise the volume of reading until it’s all together.

Informal portrait of members of the 38th Battalion AIF

returning from the trenches through Houplines, a village on the outskirts of Armentieres. Leading is 1228 Corporal (Cpl) John Charles Lewis, followed by 486 Lance Corporal (LCpl) William James Leslie Newell, Sergeant (Sgt) Harold Pankhurst and 1975 Private (Pte) George Alexander Loader. Sgt Pankhurst, a bank clerk from Tongala, Vic prior to enlistment, embarked with the rank of Private with the 19th Reinforcements, 6th Battalion from Melbourne on HMAT Themistocles on 28 July 1916. On 16 October 1917, and having attained the rank of Lance Sergeant, he died aged 21, of wounds received in action and was buried in the Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium. Pte Loader, a farm hand from Ballarat Vic prior to enlistment, embarked with the 2nd Reinforcements from Melbourne on HMAT Orontes on 16 August 1916. On 28 August 1918 he was killed in action aged 29 and was buried in the Hem Farm Military Cemetery, Hem-Monacu, France. Cpl Lewis and LCpl Newell both returned to Australia at the completion of the war.